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frequently asked questions

Additional Information

Question: I have questions I need answered about my immigration case. Can DMS assist me with this?

Answer: DMS is not a law firm and we cannot provide legal advice, opinions or recommendations to our customers about their possible legal rights, legal remedies, legal defenses, legal options or legal strategies, or answers to specific questions on forms. For this reason, we want you to speak to an experienced immigration attorney if your situation is extraordinary.


Question: Since DMS is not a law firm, can they help me find an Immigration Attorney?

Answer: Certainly. DMS has a long list of attorneys who are ready to work with you if your case is unique and needs special attention.


Question: I speak very little English. Do you have translators?

Answer: Yes; upon request, we can arrange for a translator to assist you with gathering your documents and preparing your immigration forms.


Questions: Does DMS assist with deportation and removal proceedings?

Answer: No; however, we can guide you to a firm that does.


Question: What services does DMS offer?

Answer: We assist individuals with simple immigration forms. In addition, we work with immigration law firms and attorneys with casework to include O-1, EB-1, NIW, PERM Labor Certification, L-1, Adjustment of Status Packets and employment verification. Please contact for other services that may not be listed.


Question: What is an Adjustment of Status?

Answer:  An adjustment of status refers to the process by which a foreign national present in the United States files a petition with USCIS to adjust his or her status  from non-immigrant to immigrant (i.e. permanent resident  status, and thereby obtain a green card. An Adjustment of Status is filed with Form I-485).


Question: What is consular processing?

Answer: Consular processing is the  procedure that aliens outside the U.S. must go through to become permanent  residents. Becoming a green card holder through an adjustment of status  petition is an option only for foreign nationals residing in the U.S.


Question: Where should I file my Adjustment of Status application?

Answer: Where you file your application depends on whether the underlying petition is employment based or family based, as well as your state of residence and whether or not  you are requesting premium processing. To find out where your filing location is, visit www.uscis.gov.


Question: I have moved to a different address what should I do so that I do not miss any important mail from USCIS?

Answer: You should inform USCIS of  your new address upon each move to ensure you receive all USCIS materials. If you have no pending petitions or applications, you will need to file form AR-11 (online or by mail). You may visit https://egov.uscis.gov/coa/displayCOAInitForm.do or https://www.uscis.gov/addresschange for further instruction for cases with special circumstances.


Question: I will be filing a family based adjustment of status application. Am I able to pay the filing fees with a personal check?

Answer: No. The fee must be paid  with a money order or cashier's check because your case will be processed at a  local USCIS office. Local offices accept only money orders or cashier’s checks  as payment. 


Question: I filed a family based adjustment of status a year ago and have not received a response yet. What is taking so long? I am becoming worried.

Answer: Unfortunately, it is not  unusual for a family-based adjustment of status applications to take this long to be adjudicated.  However, you can still make a status inquiry by visiting your local USCIS  office, or by contacting USCIS by phone or mail. USCIS’ contact information is  listed on the bottom left-hand corner of your receipt notice.  You may also visit https://egov.uscis.gov/e-request/displayONPTForm.do?sroPageType=onpt if you have a case pending with USCIS that is outside the normal processing time. You can get an idea of how long it will take to process your case on their website https://egov.uscis.gov/processing-times/. 


Question: I have called USCIS and the wait times are too long. Can I check my case status online?

Answer: Yes. Have your receipt notice next to you and visit https://egov.uscis.gov/casestatus/landing.do. 


Question: You have referred me to an attorney, but I do not want to utilize an attorney. Where can I find the law?

Answer: If we referred you to an attorney, its probably best that you seek counsel because immigration policy is complex and is not easily translated for those who are not experienced in the field. However, the INA is a law that governs immigration in the United States. The INA is contained in the United States Code (U.S.C.). The U.S. Code is a collection of all the laws of the United States. Title 8 of the U.S. Code covers "Aliens and Nationality." You may visit https://www.uscis.gov/legal-resources/immigration-and-nationality-act. With all sincerity, good luck.


Question: I am deaf, hard of hearing or have a speech disability. Who can I call at USCIS?

Answer? TTY 800-767-1833. 


Question: What is an Immigration Consultant?

Answer: An immigration consultant is a person who is qualified to provide non-legal immigration services. To qualify, the state requires immigration consultants to file a disclosure form and bond. Immigration consultants are categorized as Immigration Form Specialists, along with immigration assistance providers and immigration clerical assistants.


Question: What services can DocuPros Management Service Provide?

Answer:  We can provide non legal services related to an immigration matter, including but not limited to:

  • Completing a federal or state immigration form — but not advising a person on how to answer the questions.
  • Translating a person’s answers to questions in immigration forms.
  • Securing supporting documents, such as birth certificates, which may be necessary to complete the immigration forms.
  • Submitting completed forms on a person’s behalf to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
  • Making referrals to legal representation for a person in an immigration matter.


Question: If I utilize your services, must I sign a contract?

Answer: Yes; a contract is important because it is a written agreement that clearly states the services to be rendered, the documents to be prepared, and the fees to be charged.


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